Rating: 7.9 Very Good
Popularity:12
Difficulty:Medium
Year:2009
Players: 2-6 players
Playing time: 120 minutes
Age:12+

Created by: Mac Gerdts, Alexander Jung

Published by: Cranio Creations, Egmont Polska, The Game Master BV

Alternate Names: Империал 2030, 大国崛起 2030 (大國崛起 2030)

Description:

Imperial 2030 is a game on its own, based on the rules of Imperial. The six powers (USA, Europe, Russia, China, India, and Brazil) develop their industrial basis and build up armies and fleets.

They fight over control of neutral land and sea areas in order to become the most powerful nation worldwide.

In this game it is not the players who take turns, but the six powers, one after another. The players are just internationally operating investors who act in the background. By giving money to the six powers, which all have their own treasuries, the players influence the politics.

The biggest investor in each nation gains control of that nation's government and decides what the nation will do. As control of a government can change with each new investment, players may control several governments at the same time.

As investors, players should not get too attached to their preferred nation, but rather focus on where their investments have the best rates of return. Essentially the game is about money, and not about military domination!

For those who already owned Imperial, there was the opportunity to get only the new map and bonds at Essen '09, as it can be played with the old wooden bits as well.

Prices:
Retail Price:$61
Amazon:$59
Ebay:$62
Awards:
Nederlandse Spellenprijs Nominee 2011
Gouden Ludo Nominee 2011

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The world in 2030. Along with the United States, Russia and Europe, the new great powers China, India and Brazil have appeared on the horizon, in order to participate in the global race for power and influence.

But ultimately, these six.states are only puppets in a treacherous game, because their fates are controlled by powerful international investors operating in the background.

Each player takes on the role of such an investor who is on the constant lookout for the maximum return on his investment, and therefore tries to obtain a ruthless control of individual great powers. …



Don't forget the power points

Only when a nation builds factories, places flags, and in the end plays "taxation", can it advance with its power points.

It may not be possible to avoid conflicts with other nations, but nations who set up troops and wage war all the time, will not be successful in collecting many power points.

Be careful when concentrating on one nation It may be tempting to grant bonds exclusively to the nation in which the player has control, in order to stabilize the government and to enable the nation to build factories and pay interest. …



The following variants may be used individually or in combination.

Variant: Without investor card

This variation results in fewer changes in the control of governments.

Remove the investor card from game. Instead of using the investor card, each player can invest in a nation immediately after that nation takes its turn.

For example:

After China takes its turn, its owner can invest in China. Then all the other players can invest in China, starting with the player to the left of the owner of China and continuing clockwise around the table. After that India takes its turn. …



Q: Can factories also be destroyed by fleets?

A: Fleets cannot destroy a factory since they are not allowed to return from a sea region to a land region.

Q: When can nations use their military units to fight?

A: There are two possibilities:

  1. Nations that have chosen the rondel space "Maneuver" are allowed to fight against foreign armies and/or fleets.

  2. Inactive nations are allowed to fight against any foreign army or fleet that has just moved into a region in which the inactive nation has military units. This also applies if a "friendly" army moves into a home province. …




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