Welcome to the most complex metropolis of the ancient world: Rome. More than 2,000 years ago, Rome was a town full of vibrant life whose myriad inhabitants - although they could not have been more different - had one important thing in common: they were all Romans.

In Tribune, the players belong to the large and ambitious patrician families of Rome and thirst for power. By exerting their influence over the city's various town factions, they seek one of the highest offices of the Republic, that of tribune.

Will you win over the legions, be crowned with laurel wreaths, incur the favor of the gods, and be made tribune? Make ready, and send your followers into the streets of Rome to win influential allies. The time has come to write history!


Components

  • 1 Game Board
  • 100 Faction Cards
  • 26 Victory Condition Cards
  • 10 Reference Cards
  • 6 Tribune/scroll Tiles
  • 6 Eternal Favor of the gods Tiles
  • 2 Temporary favor of the gods tiles
  • 42 Faction Markers
  • 60 Denarii (various Values)
  • 30 Legion Tokens
  • 40 Laurel Tokens (various values)
  • 5 Family Sheets
  • 30 Followers (6 per color)
  • 1 Proconsul Piece
  • 1 Starting Player Coin
  • 2 Chariots

Setup

  1. Lay out the game board as shown in the diagram below.

    • Sort the faction markers by type and place them on the corresponding areas of the faction fields.
    • Place one laurel wreath in the laurel area of each faction field.
    • Place the rest of the laurel wreaths on the Field of Mars area.
    • Place the legion tokens, denarii, scroll/tribune tiles, eternal favor of the gods tiles, temporary favor of the gods tile, chariot, and proconsul piece next to the game board. These are collectively the "stock".
  2. Each player chooses a color, then takes a number of followers of that color depending on the number of players in the game. Return the remainder of the followers to the box; they will not be used.

    • 2-3 players; 6 followers
    • 4 players: 5 followers
    • 5 players: 4 followers
  3. Each player takes the family sheet of his chosen color.

  4. Each player takes one overview card and one scoring card.

  5. Shuffle the faction cards and deal six to each player. Each player immediately chooses and discards two of the six, facedown. Once all players have done so, shuffle the discards back into the deck and place it facedown near the game board to form the draw pile.

  6. Choose or randomly select a victory condition card, making sure to use one compatible with the number of players in the game. Each player takes a copy of that card and places it next to his family sheet.

    If "Alea Iacta Est" is chosen, the players must choose between a long game (red hourglass) and short game (green hourglass). The remaining victory condition cards are returned to the box; they will not be used.

  7. Randomly select a starting player, who takes the starting player coin.

  8. The starting player takes 12 denarii from the stock as his starting money, the player to his left takes 13, the next player takes 14, and so on, until each player has taken starting money.



Object of the Game

The victory condition card chosen during setup defines the individual objectives the players must pursue to win.

Depending on which card is chosen, however, and how many players are participating, the number of individual objectives that must be achieved to win (of those listed on the card) varies. Some objectives are obligatory. Obligatory objectives must be among those a player achieves in order to win.

The diagram to the right breaks down a victory condition card's elements and describes each.

Note that four of the sets of victory condition cards are for two- to four-player games, while two sets are for five-player games. Tribune can also be played with a point-value variant which does not require a victory condition card; the scoring cards are all that is needed for that game.



Game Play

Tribune is played in rounds of six phases each:

  • Phase 1: Card Placement
  • Phase 2: Placement of Followers
  • Phase 3: Region Evaluation
  • Phase 4: Faction Take-overs
  • Phase 5: Faction Benefits
  • Phase 6: Chariot Auction

The order in which players act is only significant in Phase 2, during which play begins with the player who has the starting player coin and proceeds clockwise around the table.

When all six phases are complete, the starting player coin is passed to the next clockwise player, and a new round begins. Rounds continue until a player fulfills the game's victory conditions.


Phase 1: Card Placement

In Phase 1: Card Placement, cards from the draw pile are placed on the game board in the rectangular, marble-textured card fields according to the region-specific rules below. The "Card Placement Example" diagram on the previous page also illustrates the correct placement.

Cards should be placed on the game board in region order, as listed below. As a general rule, all cards are placed faceup in the lighter card fields, and facedown in the darker card fields.

  1. Thermae: Place one card faceup on each card field.

  2. Forum Romanum: Place one card faceup on each card field.

  3. Latrine: Place one card facedown.

  4. Curia: For each of the three card fields, place cards faceup, one at a time, until that field's sum of card values totals 5 or more, or until a leader is placed after which no additional cards are placed in that particular field.

  5. Atrium Auctionorum: Place one card facedown on each of the three card fields.

  6. Catacombs: Place five cards facedown in a pile.

  7. Pantheon: Place one card facedown.

  8. Field of Mars: No cards are placed.


If the draw pile is depleted during Card Placement, the discard pile is immediately shuffled to form a new draw pile.


Cesura Magna

If a situation ever arises where there are no cards in either the draw pile or the discard pile, a "cesura magna" is triggered. This happens most often during Card Placement, but can also occur at other times.

To resolve a cesura magna, each player with more than seven cards in his hand must immediately choose and discard cards from his hand until he has only seven.

Additionally, a player controlling a faction with a displayed set of four or more cards must discard the two lowest-value cards among them, and a player controlling a faction with a displayed three-card set must discard the lowest- value card of the three. (A player controlling a faction with a two- card set does not discard either of them).


Phase 2: Placement Of Followers

In Phase 2: Placement of Followers, beginning with the starting player and continuing clockwise around the table, players take turns placing one follower at a time on the game board. This continues until each player has placed all of his followers.

When placing a follower, a player can place it on a follower space in a region, a follower space on a faction field, or the coin bowl in the upper left-hand corner of the game board. Note that the follower spaces associated with regions and faction fields may hold only one follower each.

That is, a follower space that already contains a follower cannot accommodate another. Note also that placing a follower on the Pantheon involves an additional condition; see below.


Placement on Follower Spaces in Regions

Players may freely choose on which follower spaces and in which regions they place their followers, with a few exceptions (such as that only one follower is allowed per follower space).

Players are generally allowed to place followers on multiple follower spaces in the same region, as long as the one- follower-per-space rule is observed.

By placing a follower on a region's follower space, a player gains eventual access to the cards or abilities associated with that region, which are described under "Phase 3: Region Evaluation". This will often require the player to pay denarii or discard cards from his hand during Phase 3.

During Phase 2, nothing happens in the regions apart from the placement of followers, with two exceptions:

  • Exception I: Atrium Auctionorum

    The Atrium Auctionorum has two follower spaces, labeled "1". and "2". These numbers indicate the order in which these follower spaces must be filled by followers ("1". first, "2". second). They do not indicate Phase 3 denarii costs, as the numerals without periods on follower spaces in some other regions do.

    The same player can never place his own followers on both follower spaces of the Atrium Auctionorum. As soon as a player places a follower on the "1". follower space, he flips any two of the three Atrium Auctionorum cards faceup. If and when another player places a follower on the "2". follower space, the third card is turned faceup.

  • Exception II: Pantheon

    Only a player who possesses a Vestal Virgin faction marker may place afollower on the Pantheon. When a player places a follower on a Pantheon follower space, he (and only he) may immediately look at the facedown card there.


Placement On Faction Fields

When placing followers, players may place their followers on the two follower spaces of each faction field. In doing so, they announce their intention to try to take over that faction in Phase 4: Faction Take-overs.

When placing a follower on a given faction field, a player must first fill the follower space marked "1", and only after that follower space is filled may another player place a follower on the follower space marked "2". Once both follower spaces for a given faction are full, other players may not play followers on that faction's field.

There are two universal restrictions about placing followers on the faction fields:

  • A player may never place a follower on the field of a faction he already controls.

  • A player may never place his own followers on both follower spaces of the same faction field. (Players are allowed to place followers on spaces associated with several different factions, however).


Coin Bowl Example:

The yellow player is the first player to place a follower on the coin bowl in the game round, so he takes 7 denarii upon his placement.

The two red followers and the white follower are placed later in the round, with their players taking 5 denarii for each placement.




Placement on the Coin Bowl

Players place followers on the coin bowl in order to receive denarii.

The first player to place one of his followers on the coin bowl in a given round immediately takes 7 denarii from the stock.

Subsequent players who place followers on the coin bowl that round take 5 denarii per figure placed, again taking them im- mediately upon placement.

There is no restriction on the number of followers a player may place on the coin bowl in a single round.



Phase 3: Region Evaluation

Once all players have placed all of their followers, Phase 3: Region Evaluation begins. For most regions, "evaluation" means that the cards from their card fields are dispersed, by various means, to the players who placed their followers on those regions' follower spaces.

The eight regions are evaluated in numerical order. If any of a region's follower spaces are unoccupied when it is evaluated, the corresponding cards are placed in the discard pile rather than being taken by any player.

Once a given region has been evaluated, the followers in its follower spaces are returned to their owners immediately.

The various follower spaces of the Thermae, the Forum Romanum, and the Curia can usually be evaluated simultaneously. However, some situations (such as when a player does not have enough denarii to pay for all the followers he placed) make it necessary to evaluate them in a particular order.

When this is necessary, the region is evaluated from left to right and then from top to bottom. See, for example, the Forum Romanum Evaluation Sequence scroll on this page.

There is no limit on the number of cards a player may hold in his hand, unless a cesura magna occurs.

Forum Romanum Evaluation Sequence



I. Thermae

Roman thermae, or thermal baths, date to thefirst century BC, and bathing in them came to play an important role in the social lives ofancientRomans.

Roman thermae were always built with magnificent pillared corridors and restrooms, and were accessible to the general public either free ofcharge orfor a small fee.

Players who placed followers on follower spaces in the Thermae region must pay 1 denarius to the stock for each follower so placed. In return, they take the cards adjacent to those follower spaces into their hands. A player who cannot pay the cost of a given card does not take it; the card is discarded instead.


II. Forum Romanum

The Forum Romanum was the center of political life in the Roman Empire. Constructed on formerly marshy ground, it united a variety of important Roman institutions.

In later years, under Augustus, the Forum was splendidly reconstructed and lined with marble. Daily public discourse took place in the nearby Curia, on public speaking platforms and in a number ofsquares.

Players who placed followers on follower spaces in the Forum Romanum region must pay 3 denarii to the stock for each follower placed. In return, they take the cards adjacent to those follower spaces into their hands. A player who cannot pay the cost of a given card does not take it; the card is discarded instead.


III. Latrine

Rome was famous for its magnificent latrines, where citizens talked together about business and everyday life in a relaxed atmosphere. Many were decorated with mosaic flooring, paintings, and marble walls.

Visiting the toilet was closely connected with health care and hygiene, and the spacious buildings - sometimes with up to 80 seats - were regularly cleaned with run-off water from the thermal baths and aqueducts.

Latrine Example:

In Phase 2, Mike placed one of his followers on the Latrine. In Phase 3, when the Latrine is resolved, Mike flips over the card on the Latrine's card field, revealing a Plebeian of card value 6.



Mike now has two options. He can either pay 6 denarii to the stock and take the card, or discard the card and take 6 denarii from the stock. Being short on funds, Mike discards the Plebeian and takes the coins.


The player who placed a follower on the follower space of the Latrine region turns over the facedown card and then has two options:

  1. He can take the card's card value in denarii from the stock, and then discard the card.

  2. He can take the card into his hand by paying to the stock denarii equal to the card's card value. Note that a leader, with a printed value of 0, can be taken for free.


IV. Curia

"Curia" was the name for the central assembly place in a Roman town. In Rome, Gaius Julius Caesar erected. a large, brick building where senate meetings could be held. This so-called "Curia Julia" was located near the Forum Romanum, and could accommodate about 300 senators.

Players who placed followers on the follower spaces in the Curia may choose to discard one card from their hand for each follower so placed. In return, they take all of the cards adjacent to each follower space for which a card was discarded.

A player who can't discard a card, or chooses not to, does not receive the corresponding cards from the game board. They are instead discarded.


V. Atrium Auctionorum

Some of the earliest auctions took place in ancient Rome, often after military campaigns to dispose of the spoils. Such auctions usually took place in the Atrium Auctionorum, a classic auction hall. Exceptional auctions - such as an auction of the emperor's household - were also held there.

Remember: Two cards from the Atrium Auctionorum are flipped over as soon as a player places a follower on the "1". follower space, and the third card is flipped if a follower is later placed on the "2". follower space.


Curia Example: In Phase 2, Michelle placed one of her green followers on the first Curia follower space, and another on the third. John placed a yellow follower on the second follower space.

When the Curia is evalutated in Phase 3, Michelle first discards one card from her hand to take the cards on the Curia's first cardfield. 'Then, John chooses one of his cards to discard, and takes the three cards on the second card field. A bargain!

Then it's Michelle's turn again. She discards the value 0 legate she picked up moments ago, and takes the Senator from the third card field. Since the Curia is always resolved from left to right, she is able to discard the Legate - for which she had no use - instead of having to discard a more valuable card.



There are two different circumstances under which the Atrium Auctionorum may be evaluated:

If the "l". follower space is occupied but the "2". follower space is not, then the player whose figure occupies the "1". follower space must pay 1 denarius, but then takes both faceup cards into his hand. The facedown card is discarded.

If both. the "1". and "2".follower spaces are occupied, then the two players with followers on those follower spaces bid against one another in a closed-fist auction to determine who will take the three cards. This is done as follows:

  1. Each of the two players conceals his coin pile from the other while secretly putting any number of denarii from it in a closed fist. (The coin pile is concealed so the other player will not be able to deduce how many denarii his opponent is holding in his fist).

  2. When both players have concealed coins, they hold their hands over the game board and reveal their bids simultaneously.

  3. The losing bidder (i.e., the one who bid fewer denarii) keeps his bid, returning it to his coin pile.

  4. The winning bidder (i.e., the one who bid more denarii) gives his bid to the losing bidder, but takes the three cards from the Atrium Auctionorum.

In the case of a tie in bidding, the player whose follower is on the "1". follower space is the winning bidder.


VI. Catacombs

The Catacombs, named after the Roman term for the special volcanic substratum at the Via Appia (ad catacumbas), were underground burial vaults. In some cases special burial chambers were hewn into the rock. The Catacombs were extended considerably as Christianity spread, as burial was not permitted within the Roman town walls in ancient Rome.

At the beginning of Phase 3, there should be five facedown cards on the Catacombs. The evaluation of the Catacombs begins with the player whose follower occupies the "4" follower space examining those five cards and then, at his option, purchasing any one of them for 4 denarii, which are placed on the Colosseum (adjacent to the Catacombs region).

Next, the player whose follower occupies the "3" follower space examines the remaining cards and may, at his option, purchase any one of them for 3 denarii, which are also placed on the Colosseum. Finally, the player whose follower occupies the "2" follower space examines the remaining cards and may, at his option, purchase any one of them for 2 denarii, which are placed on the Colosseum. Any remaining cards are discarded.

Note that players who do not wish to purchase any of the available cards don't have to pay, and remember that denarii paid for cards taken from the Catacombs are always placed on the Colosseum area, rather than in the stock of denarii to the side of the game board. Note also that unoccupied follower spaces are simply passed over when evaluating the Catacombs.


VII. Pantheon

The Pantheon in Rome was an opulent construction with an almost perfectly rounded dome, and dedicated to all ofthe Roman gods. It probably also served as a court building, and as the emperor's assembly hall. It was erected around AD 120 as a replacement for a temple dedicated to the deities representing the planets.

Catacombs Example:

In Phase 2, Mike placed red figures on the "4" and "2" follower spaces of the Catacombs, and Zoe placed a white figure on the "3"follower space.

In Phase 3, Mike is the first to look through the stack of five facedown cards on the Catacombs card field. He selects one,puts it in his hand, and pays 4 denarii to the Colosseum area (rather than to the stock).

Then, Zoe looks through the remaining four cards. She isn't interested in any of them, so she declines to pay and takes nothing.

Finally, Mike chooses one of the remaining cards (there are still four cards available, since Zoe didn't take one), puts it in his hand, and this time pays 2 denarii to the Colosseum.

Note that in Phase 5, the player who controls the Gladiators will have the option to take all of the denarii from the Colosseum area. If it happens to be Mike, he will take precisely the same money he paid in Phase 3.



Remember: A player must have a Vestal Virgins faction marker on his family sheet to place a follower on a Pantheon follower space. A player may not place his followers on both follower spaces of the Pantheon. When a player places a follower on a Pantheon follower space, he may immediately (and secretly) look at the facedown card on the Pantheon card Held.

When the Pantheon is evaluated, the card on its card field is first turned faceup. Then, each player with a follower on a Pantheon follower space may, at his option, discard a card from his hand as a sacrifice.

The sacrifice may be of any card value, but must match the faction of the turned-up card. Once each player has made a sacrifice or declined to do so, the turned-up card is discarded.

Then, each player who made a sacrifice takes an eternal favor of the gods tile. Players who did not make sacrifices take nothing. A player who takes an eternal favor of the tile who already had a temporary favor of the gods tile must discard the latter.


VIII. Field of Mars

The Field of Mars, or "Campus Martius", was a square of publicly owned Roman land just outside the city where triumphal marches began and where field exercises were conducted. It was also the place where foreign ambassadors stayed while visiting the city.

Each player who placed a follower on the Field of Mars region may, at his option, discard a pair of cards of the same faction from his hand when the Field of Mars is evaluated. All players should make these discards simultaneously (such as by placing their pairs facedown on the table, and then turning them faceup only once all players have done so).

Field of Mars Example:

John (the yellow player) and Michelle (the green player) both placed figures on the Field of Mars in Phase 2. 'When the Field of Mars is evaluated, John and Michelle each have the option to discard a pair of cards of the same faction, taking care to reveal their chosen cards at the same time.

John reveals a value 6 Senator and a value 4 Senator. Michelle turns up a value 4 Legate and a value 2 Legate. Since each of them discarded a legal pair of cards, each takes one laurel. John also takes an additional laurel, since his pair's sum of values is 10, compared to Michelle's sum of only 6.



Any player making a paired discard may take one laurel wreath from the Field of Mars area. A player who placed more than one follower on the Field of Mars may discard a pair for each follower he placed, and take multiple wreaths.

An additional wreath is also taken by the player whose discarded pair has the highest sum of card values. For example, a player who discards a value 3 Gladiator and a value 4 Gladiator has a sum of values of 7. If only one player placed a follower on the Field of Mars, he automatically takes the additional wreath, provided he discards a legal pair. If two or more players tie, no additional laurel wreath is awarded.



Phase 4: Faction Take-overs

In Phase 4: Faction Take-overs, players who placed followers on the follower spaces of the faction fields attempt to carry out their take-overs by playing sets of cards from their hands.

Take-over attempts are always carried out in the order in which the faction fields are printed on the game board, from left to right. That is, all Gladiator take-over attempts are always conducted first, followed by all Legate take-over attempts, and so on.


Attempting a Take-over

Only a player who placed a follower on a given faction's field during Phase 2 can attempt to take over that faction in Phase 4. However, a player who placed a follower on a given faction field is not required to make such an attempt; he may simply decline to do so when the time comes.

To attempt to take over a faction, a player plays a set of cards faceup from his hand. All of the cards in a set must match the faction that the player is attempting to take over. Additionally, a set must have at least two cards in it. (There is no maximum set size).

If the faction is not controlled by another player, any legal set is sufficient for a take-over.

If the faction is controlled by another player, however, for the new set to be sufficient for a take-over, the new set must meet one of the following two requirements:

  1. The new set must either consist of more cards than the current controller's set (in which case their card values are not relevant), or

  2. The new set's sum of values must be greater than the sum of values in the current controller's set (in which case the number of cards played is not relevant).

When a player's set is sufficient to take over a faction, that set remains faceup on the table in front of that player to show that he has control of the faction in question. It becomes the set that other players must beat in future rounds to take over that faction.

Note: It is possible to attempt to take over more than one faction per turn, if a player used several of his followers to attempt a take-over on several different factions.

A player who loses control of a faction immediately discards his beaten set from the table.

Note: A player who currently controls a given faction can't attempt to take it over, and can't add additional cards to the set he originally used to take it over.


Two-player Take-overs

If two different players have placed followers on the same faction's field, the player whose follower is in the "2" follower space must go first.

As always, he may decline to play a set, in which case the player in the "1" follower space may then attempt a take- over that is treated normally.

However, if the "2" player does play a set (which must, as usual, be sufficient to seize control), the "1" player may then, before the ultimate success of the take-over is determined, play an even better set. If he cannot, or chooses not to, the "2" player takes over the faction and the previous controller (if there was one) immediately discards his beaten set.

If the "1" player does play a better set, however, then the "1" player takes over control of the faction. In that case, the "2" player takes his own set back into his hand, but must discard one of the cards from it as a penalty.

As always, the previous controller (if there was one) immediately discards his beaten set.


Successful Take-overs

When a new player takes over control of a faction, that player immediately receives its take-over benefit, which is printed on each of that faction's cards. If a leader was played as part of the take- over, the player will also receive the benefit of the leader's special ability.

Additionally, if the player doesn't have one already, he takes one of that faction's faction markers. The player who lost control of the faction does not lose the faction marker he already has.

Finally, if that player is the first player in the game to control that faction, he takes the starting laurel wreath from that faction's field.


Phase 5: Faction Benefits



In Phase 5: Faction Benefits, players receive the faction benefits of the factions they control. (Note the important difference between a "faction benefit" and a "take-over benefit").

Faction benefits are always received in the order in which the faction fields are printed on the game board, from left to right. That is, the Gladiators benefit is received by their controller first, followed by the Legates, and so on.

Each faction's benefit is summarized on the family sheets, depicted on the game board with symbols, and described in detail beginning on page 13.

Some faction benefits can only be received if certain conditions are met, while others present options that the player receiving the benefit may choose between.

When all faction benefits have been received by controlling players, Phase 6 begins.


Phase 6: Chariot Auction



In Phase 6: Chariot Auction, players bid for the chariot, which the winning bidder can place on the faction field of a faction he controls to prevent another player from taking control of that faction in the next round.

Players bid by hiding any number of their denarii (including zero) in a closed fist and holding it out over the game board. Once all players have done so, all bids are revealed simultaneously. The highest bidder wins the chariot and pays his bid to the stock. Other players keep the denarii they bid.

The auction winner has two options. He may either place the chariot on the faction field of any faction he controls, blocking that faction, or he may instead elect not to block any faction, and simply leave the chariot off the game board. A player may wish to exercise the second option in order to prevent another player from blocking a faction over which the winning bidder seeks control.

If there is a tie in bidding for the chariot, all players keep their bids and the chariot is placed off the game board, blocking no faction.

A faction blocked by the chariot cannot have followers placed on it, and cannot be taken over. However, the controller of the faction may still receive its faction benefit in Phase 5.

At the end of Phase 6, the starting player coin is passed one player clockwise, any cards remaining on the game board are discarded, and the next round begins.



End of the Game

A game of Tribune ends when a player fulfills the required number of objectives, as shown on the victory condition card chosen at the beginning of the game, and as further determined by the number of players in the game.

Although individual objectives marked "obligatory" must be met for a player to fulfill the victory condition requirements, it doesn't matter which of the listed objectives are achieved, as long as the total quantity is met. Obligatory objectives count as normal toward the total quantity required.

As soon as a player fulfills the necessary number of victory objectives, he must speak the famous words, "Veni, vidi, vici". However, play then continues until the round is finished, which may allow other players to also meet the game's victory conditions that round.

If several players fulfill the necessary number of victory objectives in the same round, those players compare the point values of their various achievements, and the player with the highest total is the winner. The point values of various achievements are listed below, and are also itemized on the scoring cards.

Note: If a player achieves the needed number of objectives but has less points than other players, he must still announce that he has completed his objectives and end the game.

AchievementPoint Value
Tribune Tile7
Scroll Tile3
Eternal Favor of the Gods Tile5
Temporary Favor of the Gods Tile2
Each Legion Token2
Each Laurel Wreath Token1
Every 10 Denarii1
Each Faction Marker1
First Player to Fulfill Victory Objectives2


The Victory Conditions

There are six victory objectives listed on each victory condition card. The sections below give more information about how each type of objective is fulfilled.

  • Tribune

    This objective is fulfilled when the player possesses a tribune tile.

  • Favor Of The Gods

    This objective is fulfilled while the player possesses either an eternal favor of the gods tile or the temporary favor of the gods tile. In the case of the latter, the objective is not considered fulfilled if the player has the temporary favor of the gods tile taken away from him.

  • Laurel Wreaths

    This objective is fulfilled when the player possesses the number of laurel wreaths listed on the victory condition card.

  • Legions

    This objective is fulfilled when the player possesses the number of legions listed on the victory condition card.

  • Denarii

    This objective is fulfilled when the player possesses the number of denarii listed on the victory condition card.

  • Faction Markers

    This objective is fulfilled when the player possesses the number of faction markers listed on the victory condition card.

Remember that each player may only possess one faction marker per faction.



The Point-value Variant

Tribune can be played without victory condition cards; this is the point-value variant.

When playing the point-value variant, the game ends at the end of the round in which one player has collected (or exceeded) a certain number of faction markers, which varies according to the number of players.

Then, each player determines a point score according to the table of achievement values in the previous section, and the highest scorer wins the game.

Number of PlayersFaction Markers to End of the Game
55 faction markers
46 faction markers
36 faction markers
27 faction markers


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