Rating: 7.6 Very Good
Popularity:4
Difficulty:Easy
Year:2008
Players: 2-2 players
Playing time: 20 minutes
Age:0+

Created by: Peter Burley, Peter Dennis, Neil Merryweather, Steve Tolley

Published by: Burley Games, 999 Games, Devir

Alternate Names: Kamisado Pocket, Камисадо

Description:

Kamisado is a game of pure skill and strategy with no dice, cards or other chance element - it's just you against your opponent!

The aim in each round is to be the first to get an octagonal "dragon tower" to the opposite side of the board; towers move in straight lines, either forwards or diagonally forwards. The twist is that you must move the tower of the color matching the space on which the opponent moved on her previous turn.

As the game progresses, you'll find that the routes you want to use are blocked by enemy towers - and sometimes your own! If you can't move, your opponent moves again immediately, moving the tower matching the color of the space occupied by the stymied tower.

As the game unfolds, your towers will be promoted to "Sumos" and have the ability to push your opponent's pieces backwards, earning you extra turns.

The situations continue to become more complex and challenging, until one player accumulates the required winning total and can be declared a "Kamisado Grand Master" - until the next game!

Prices:
Retail Price:$29
Ebay:$59
Awards:
Le Lys Grand Public Finalist 2012
Spiel des Jahres Recommended 2010
Deutscher Lernspielpreis "9 years and up" Nominee 2010
UK Games Expo Best Abstract Game Winner 2009
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Components

  • 8x8 Playing board
  • 16 Dragon Towers
  • Two sets of octagonal 'sumo rings'
  • Rulebook

A playing board, divided into 64 squares in eight different colors.

The playing board is double-sided, one side being as shown below, while the reverse side has Chinese characters marked on each square.

This has been done to assist those suffering from color blindness, and also for those players who just think it looks better with the Chinese characters added!

So you can choose whichever side of the board you like. The game is just the same, but the 'look' is different! …



A Standard Match is played up to 3 points (i.e. the first player to score 3 points is the winner). The match starts by playing an 'Initial Round', exactly as described above for Single Round play.

After the end of this first round (and subsequent rounds), two important things will happen:

A 'Sumo' is Born!

The player who won the first (or previous) round places an octagonal 'Sumo ring' on the dragon tower that went through to a square on the opponent's 'home row'. …



A Standard Match is played up to 7 points (i.e. the first player to score 7 points is the winner). The match starts by playing an 'Initial Round', exactly as described above for Single Round play.

After the end of this first round (and subsequent rounds), two important things will happen:

A 'Sumo' (or 'Double Sumo') is Born!

The player who won the first (or previous) round places an octagonal 'Sumo ring' on the appropriate dragon tower (as described for a Standard Match). If the tower concerned has no rings on it already (i.e. it is an 'ordinary' tower), the largest size of Sumo ring is used. …



A Marathon Match is played up to 15 points (i.e. the first player to score 15 points is the winner). The match starts by playing an 'Initial Round', exactly as described above for Single Round play. After the end of this first round (and subsequent rounds), two important things will happen:

A 'Sumo' (or 'Double Sumo' or 'Triple Sumo') is Born!

The player who won the first (or previous) round places an octagonal 'Sumo ring' on the appropriate dragon tower (as described for a Standard or Long Match). If the tower concerned has no rings on it already (i.e. it is an 'ordinary' tower), the largest size of Sumo ring is used. …



When you play Kamisado, you may wish to keep a record of your moves. This can be useful if you need to break off partway through a match (or even a round) and complete it another time. F

The annotation is totally language independent, and the entry for each move comprises four symbols. Firstly, there is a colored octagon representing the piece which was moved (each different color bearing a different Chinese symbol to assist the color-blind). These octagonal symbols are as shown below: …




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