Love Letter Solitaire is a single player adaptation of the game. It is assumed the official rules are known before reading the rules for this single player variant. Ideally the original game has been played a few times as well. The following rules built upon those rules; they do not replace them.

Deal one card to the player and put one card face down; that face down card is the player 's secret agent.

Make room for a discard pile; this discard pile is shared between the player and the princess's retinue. The discard pile is open; the cards may be spread out, so it is clear which cards have already been discarded.


Object of the Game

The goal of the game is to find a way to get a love letter delivered to the princess before getting caught by here retinue and before she retires to her bedroom.


Setup

Find the princess and remove her from the deck; shuffle the deck afterwards. Put the princess on the playing field and deal 6 cards face down in front of her; these cards are her retinue.

Deal one card to the player and put one card face down; that face down card is the player's secret agent.

Make room for a discard pile; this discard pile is shared between the player and the princess's retinue. The discard pile is open; the cards may be spread out, so it is clear which cards have already been discarded.



Game Play

These cards are the playing queue acting as the player ' s opponent. Play progresses from left to right. These cards protect the princess from the player.

In this varient, the Princess's Retinue will be referred to as 'the opponent'.

Taking Turns

The game progresses by alternating turns between the player and the opponent. As with the original Love Letter, the player draws a card from the draw pile and decides which of the two cards he will discard.

After the player has taken his turn, the first card (starting from the left) is played from the princess's retinue queue. It is discarded and resolved normally after which the player takes his next turn.

Discovering the identity and order of the opponent 's cards and preventing dangerous combinations is key to winning a game of Love Letter Solitaire.

The player always starts.

Secret Agent Card

Unlike the original version of Love Letter, the player is assisted by a secret agent. Whenever the player takes his turn, he may play the secret agent card instead of drawing and playing a card from his hand. The player does not need to know in advance which character the secret agent represents; the secret agent may be played, even if the card was face down.

A face down secret agent is the only protection a player has from a guard card. Progressing through these rules, it will be clear why later.

Targeting And Visibility

Whenever the player is taking his turn and must choose another player or another player's hand, he can target any opponent card, excluding the princess. The princess can only be targeted by the player if there is no other card in front of the princess protecting her.

Whenever the opponent needs to target another player or another player's hand, the player decides if it will target his hand or secret agent. If the opponent needs to target one of their own, for instance when comparing cards when playing the baron card, the next card in line is picked.

Cards that are 'known' must always be turned face up. Cards retain this state even when they are swapped or traded. This means the player could use a king to trade his face up secret agent for a face down card handpicked from the opponent; he would again have a face down secret agent.

If the player plays a card that states that an opponent is out of the round, only the targeted card is discarded. The game is not over.

Knowledge is shared. There is no difference between cards that are known to the player and cards that are known to the opponent. Revealed cards are always left face up.

Victory Conditions

The player wins the game immediately when the opponent 's playing queue including the princess is empty.

The opponent wins:

  • whenever it plays a card that results in the player being out of the round; it does not matter if the card was played targeting the secret agent or the player's hand.

  • when it is forced to play the princess card (when it is last in the queue); the princess retires to her bedroom.

  • when a card should be drawn, and the draw pile is empty.


Cards

Guard

Player: target any card excluding a protected princess.

When guessed correctly (or if the card already was face up) the target card is discarded; otherwise the target card remains face up.

Opponent: the target will be the players hand or the secret agent. However, as knowledge is shared between player and opponent, guessing the card in the players hand or a face up secret agent card will automatically succeed and result in the player losing the game.

When the guard targets a face down secret agent, the opponent needs to guess. Pick the character with the highest point value that is still somewhere face down in the game (including the draw pile).

The opponent may guess a guard character.

Example: if the player has a countess in his hand with a king in the discard pile and a prince face up in the retinue queue, the opponent will guess prince (as there are 2 in the game).

When the opponent guesses correctly the game is over; otherwise the secret agent remains face up.

Guards are ideal for revealing the opponent's cards. Even an incorrect guess is useful as the target card will remain face up.

Priest

Player: target any card.

Opponent: target the secret agent. There is no effect when there is no face down secret agent.

Priests are a great way for finding out which card is in front of the princess.

Baron

Player: pick any opponent's card to compare points with. Both hand or secret agent may be used as the reference value.

Opponent: always use the card next in line as reference. The player chooses his hand or the secret agent to compare with.

Any card used for comparison remains face up.

When the player loses, the game is over; when the opponent loses, just discard the baron card (and the reference card in the retinue queue if it was the players turn).

Barons in front of the princess are dangerous; deal with them swiftly.

Handmaid

Player: protection until the next turn for both the players hand and secret agent.

Opponent: protection until the next turn for all opponent's cards.

Handmaids in front of the princess are lethal; act accordingly.

Prince

Player: pick any card excluding a protected princess.

Opponent: the player chooses either his hand or his secret agent. Should the player be protected by the handmaiden, there is no effect; the opponent is not allowed to discard from his own queue.

The new card is placed face down if the secret agent was discarded.

Princes are an ideal way to replace face up secret agents.

King

Player: pick any opponent card, excluding a protected princess.

Opponent: the player chooses either his hand or his secret agent to swap with the next card in the queue.

A facedown queue card remains facedown as a secret agent.

Kings can be used in the endgame to prevent the princess from retiring to her bedroom by trading an unprotected princess.

Countess

When played the countess has no effect. The countess should be discarded whenever she is in the player's hand together with a king or prince.

Countesses are excellent when used in conjunction with a baron.


Additional Rules

If for any reason the last card in the queue is unplayable, the opponent just discards this card when it his turn; the queue will be empty and the player wins.

This might happen if a player successfully transfers the (unprotected!) princess to his hand, which is a winning move.


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